region
region

We live and work in one of North America’s most diverse, beautiful and wild regions—Canada’s Columbia and Southern Rocky Mountains.

Our region is recognized globally as a critical component of North America’s most intact wildlife and wilderness corridor, running from Yellowstone in the south to the Yukon in the north. It is home to one of the most diverse and dense populations of large animals in North America.

This region also includes the Columbia Wetlands—at 180 km long, they are one of the longest intact wetlands in North America and form part of the Columbia Headwaters, source of the mighty Columbia River. Along with its adjacent mountain ecosystems, the Columbia Headwaters provides source water to the Arctic, Pacific and Hudson Bay watersheds.

Due to our region’s connected wild systems, its been rated by global scientists as providing one of the best opportunities on the planet for successfully addressing the impacts of climate change.

Six local Wildsight branches work at the grassroots level to build a conservation ethic in our communities and a culture of sustainability. These autonomous branches are as diverse as the towns they’re located in: Creston, Elk Valley (Fernie), Golden, Invermere, Kimberley/Cranbrook and Revelstoke. All of our branches truly exemplify that small, local steps can make an enormous difference.


We are seeking up to eight young adults in the Kimberley/Cranbrook area interested in tackling unique local projects that address the global climate crisis…Read More 
Little feet might not walk far, but the goal was never distance. Wildsight Creston and Family Place, a Creston-based community services provider, partnered for…Read More 
Dr. Rob Serrouya has spent his career studying caribou and the ecosystems which have supported caribou for millenia. But things are rapidly changing for caribou…Read More 
Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we have made the difficult but necessary decision to not run the Columbia River Field School (CRFS) in…Read More 
Ben Collison was born and raised in the Kootenays, and is currently a masters student at Dalhousie University. As part of his masters degree, Ben…Read More 
Private landowners can liquidate forests with little concern for wildlife, water, and local communities. Landowners are not even required to consult with affected residents. Minimal regulations means there’s no requirement to consider long-term sustainability.Read More 
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