Columbia Wetlands

“One of the most precious things on a world scale…is the Columbia River Wetlands.” Robert Bateman

The Columbia Wetlands are one of the world’s living natural treasures and as such, they have been recognized as a Ramsar site, a wetlands of international importance. With more than 260 bird species recorded, as well as numerous fish, reptiles, amphibians, mammals species and countless invertebrates, the Columbia Wetlands is a hotspot of biodiversity.  Nestled between British Columbia’s Rocky and Purcell mountain ranges, these wetlands are the source of the largest river flowing into the Pacific Ocean in North America—the mighty Columbia. It is here in our own wild backyard that everything begins.

These wetlands provide essential winter habitat for hundreds of elk and deer. Moose, wolf, cougar, coyote, beaver, river otter and grizzly bears are just some of the larger mammals that call this place home.

It is ours to treasure, ours to protect.

CW6_Pat Morrow
Pat Morrow

HISTORY OF PROTECTION

In 1996, Columbia Valley local residents and government agencies came together, agreeing that the stretch of the Columbia River and wetlands from Donald in the north to Fairmont in the south should be protected for wildlife. A Wildlife Management Area was established, protecting wildlife under the BC Wildlife Act throughout the entire 180-kilometre stretch. Recreational and historical uses — fishing, hunting and trapping — would continue, but under an innovative philosophy that places wildlife and habitat values first.

On June 5, 2005, World Environment Day, the Columbia Wetlands received much deserved international recognition as a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance. The largest wetland of its kind in British Columbia and protected under the BC Wildlife Act, the Columbia Wetlands qualified under all eight Ramsar Criteria and comprise a regionally unparalleled diversity of 16 habitats, sheltering around 216 species.

Over the past 20 years, Wildsight and the British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations have been co-applicants for federal boating regulations on the Columbia Wetlands and River through the Columbia Wetlands Wildlife Management Area (CWWMA).

On June 28, 2008, a package of amendments to the boating regulations was published in Part I of the Canada Gazette, containing proposed amendments to the Regulations which would control the navigation of vessels in the Columbia River and Wetlands between Fairmont Hot Springs and Donald Station (north-west of Golden), BC in order to protect environmental values.

Two of these regulations became law, August 19, 2009:

  1. A year-round prohibition on the operation of power-driven vessels in the wetlands of the Columbia River.
  2. A year-round prohibition on towing persons on water skis, surfboards or other similar equipment in the main channel of the Columbia River at any time.

WHERE WE ARE NOW

This fall, thanks to your support, the third part of the boating regulation, limiting boats to 20hp on the upper Columbia River, between Fairmont Hot Springs and Donald (excluding Lake Windermere) was enacted!

Thank you for helping us make this happen. 

 


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